Professional headshot of Carlos Cesnik posing and smiling.

Carlos E. S. Cesnik

Richard A. Auhll Department Chair

Location

3000 François-Xavier Bagnoud Aerospace Building
1320 Beal Avenue Ann Arbor, MI 48109-2140

For department business: 
aero-chair@umich.com

Additional Title(s)

Clarence L. (Kelly) Johnson Collegiate Professor

Professor and Director, Active Aeroelasticity and Structures Research Laboratory

Primary Website

https://a2srl.engin.umich.edu/

Education

Georgia Institute of Technology
Ph.D., Aerospace Engineering, 1994
M.S., Aerospace Engineering, 1991

Instituto Tecnológico de Aeronáutica, Brazil
M.S., Aeronautical Engineering, 1989
Engineering Degree, Aeronautical Engineering, 1987

Research Interests

Multi-physics modeling, analysis and simulation. Computational and experimental aeroelasticity/aeromechanics:  coupled nonlinear aeroelasticity and flight dynamic response in high-altitude long-endurance (HALE) aircraft and advanced jet transport aircraft; aerothermoelastic modeling, analysis and simulation of hypersonic vehicles; active vibration and noise reductions in helicopters. Structural health management: damage detection in metallic and composite structures, and metamaterials; guided-wave modeling, transducer design, and signal processing.

Professional Service

American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (Fellow)
Royal Aeronautical Society (Fellow)
American Helicopter Society (Lifetime member)

Biography

Carlos Cesnik is the Clarence L. (Kelly) Johnson Professor of Aerospace Engineering and the founding Director of the Active Aeroelasticity and Structures Research Laboratory at the University of Michigan. He currently directs the Airbus-Michigan Center for Aero-Servo-Elasticity of Very Flexible Aircraft (CASE-VFA). His research interests have focused on computational and experimental aeroelasticity of very flexible aircraft; coupled nonlinear aeroelasticity and flight dynamic response in high-altitude long-endurance (HALE) aircraft and advanced jet transport aircraft; aerothermoelastic modeling, analysis and simulation of hypersonic vehicles; active vibration and noise reductions in helicopters. His research also spans the field of structural health monitoring for damage detection in metallic and composite structures, and metamaterials: guided-wave modeling, transducer design, and signal processing.

Professor Cesnik is a Fellow of the American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics (AIAA) and a Fellow of the Royal Aeronautical Society. He serves as AIAA’s Director for the Aerospace Design and Structures Group and is an elected member of AIAA’s Council of Directors. He has over 350 publications as archival journal and conference papers, and several invited lectures in the areas of aeroelasticity, smart structures, structural mechanics, and structural health monitoring.

Prior to his appointment as a tenured associate professor at the University of Michigan in 2001, Prof. Cesnik was the Boeing Assistant Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics and then Associate Professor of Aeronautics and Astronautics at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. He has also worked as a research engineer at Embraer S.A.  Professor Cesnik has been an active private pilot since 1981.

POSITIONS HELD AT MICHIGAN

Awards

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